Native Culture

Walking the Mojave Indian Trail

Travel in General Mataviam described travel in general to Kelly (1933: 23:7)  in the following way: Travelers packed everything on their backs, and wore any kind of foot gear.  Children always wore shoes; if the children were too small to walk, their parents took turns carrying them.  They also took turns packing the water jar,... Read More »

An Obsidian Flake

I suppose the cool thing about this flake is that it was found in a little spot in a large meadow at the bottom of a valley in a local mountain range hundreds of miles from the closest source of obsidian. This may mean it was part of a trade or series of trades between... Read More »

The Renegade Indian

A chapter from Senator Harry Reid’s book, “Searchlight: The Camp That Didn’t Fail” On February 21, 1940, the banner headline in the Las Vegas Review-Journal— BODY OF INDIAN FOUND— recalled for many in the town memories of the first murder the dead Indian had committed, thirty years earlier at Timber Mountain, just a few miles... Read More »

Kwanamis

KwanamisKwanamis The dream world was as important to the Mojave People as was the physical world. It was from this dream state instruction was given that would guide them to their destiny. The Mojave Warrior was as brutal and violent in battle as his enemy. Even more so, not only because of strength and endurance... Read More »

Review of The Hunt for Willie Boy: Indian Hating and Popular Culture

by James A. Sandos and Larry E. Burgess Review: Linda S. Parker – San Diego State University The authors have written an enlightening historical ethnography of the Willie Boy episode. By illuminating the frontier myth and Indian-hating inherent in the dominant story of Willie Boy, and using Chemehuevi ethnographic literature and oral traditions, Sandos and... Read More »

Michael White (Miguel Blanco) & Rancho Muscupiabe

The Old Spanish Trail had become increasingly used as a pack mule trail between New Mexico and California, and with this traffic came the opportunity for those to take advantage of the distance and desperate nature of the land. California horses were beautiful creatures, and the mules were taller and stronger than those in New... Read More »

Mojave War Club

  The Mojave Indians were known as “the clubbers”, and their attacks were feared  as exceptionally brutal and violent.  Their war clubs were ball-shaped with a handle that could be held on to with both hands.  The warriors would run in close and thrust the club up and under their victim’s chin breaking their jaw... Read More »

The Origin of People

One day, Coyote went out to hunt rabbits. While he was hunting, he saw a large naked woman in the distance. This excited him. He said to himself, “Whew, I have never seen a woman like that. I will follow her.” He followed her for a long time, but could not quite overtake her. He... Read More »

A Story of Four Boys

One day a wagon train rolled in off the desert to San Bernardino. On this wagon train there were four sick and hungry Paiute Indian boys. Each one of these boys was placed with separate families in San Bernardino, and each one of the boys, living in a good Mormon home, got better. One boy... Read More »

Aphid Loaf

I have heard the Indians would go to the reeds in the riparian areas where aphids fed in large numbers, brush away the tiny bugs and scrape their shiny-sticky waste from the blades. En masse the material would be shaped into a large, heavy loaf with a hardness and sweetness similar to rock candy. In... Read More »

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