Tag: desert towns

Rhyolite & the Bullfrog Gold

The best strike I ever made was in 1904 when I discovered the Rhyolite and Bullfrog district. I went into Boundary Canyon with five burros and plenty of grub, figuring to look over the country northeast from there. When I stopped at Keane Wonder Mine, Ed Cross was there waiting for his partner, Frank Howard,... Read More »

Death Valley’s Titus Canyon

by Betty J.  Tucker –  Desert Magazine April, 1971 (photos – Walter Feller) The road and scenery through Titus Canyon in Death Valley produces all the ups and downs of a young love, then steadies out into the young matronly area. Further on, it matures and gains the stature of sedate old age. That’s a... Read More »

Shorty’s Grubstake

Once I asked Shorty Harris how he obtained his grubstakes. “Grubstakes,” he answered, “like gold, are where you find them. Once I was broke in Pioche, Nev., and couldn’t find a grubstake anywhere. Somebody told me that a woman on a ranch a few miles out wanted a man for a few days’ work. I... Read More »

The Walters Family

The Walters family is an important part of Hesperia history.  Starting with George Francis Walters, who moved his family from Illinois to California because his wife, Harriet C Finigan Walters had asthma. The family first settled in the Riverside area where he went to work for the Santa Fe Railroad. According to Bolton Minister, son... Read More »

Modern Cliff Dwellers

by Glenn Adams A rental sign  could honestly read, “Doublin Gulch, modern cliff  dwellings for men only.”  But these living quarters, carved out of the earth, are never rented. They belong to the occupants while they live there,  and the first man to move-in is the next owner. It is not a written law, but... Read More »

Scenes in America Deserta

by Peter Reyner Banhamorld: “Las Vegas is a symbol, above all else, of the impermanence of man in the desert, and not least because one is never not aware of the desert’s all pervading presence; wherever man has not built nor paved over, the desert grimly endures – even on some of the pedestrian islands... Read More »

Rhyolite Train Station – 1931

Rhyolite Train Station — Rhyolite, Nevada — Burton Frasher – 1931 Rhyolite Ghost Town... Read More »

Farmland – Oro Grande

“During his years at the upper crossing, Captain Lane, as Aaron was known throughout much of his life in California, had ample opportunity to discover where the richest farmlands lie along the Mojave River.” Pioneer of the Mojave – Green Gold and Mint... Read More »

Riverside Cement – Oro Grande

Riverside Cement in Oro Grande, CA started in 1907 as the Golden State Cement Plant. It was shut down during the depression and restarted as Riverside Cement in 1942. The plant was enlarged and completely rebuilt in the late 40s. In late 1997, TXI purchased Riverside Cement. More about Oro... Read More »

The Man Who Was Hanged Twice

Skidoo came to life because of a fog. When Harry Ramsey and a man called One-eye Thompson lost their way on a road leading to the new boom camp of Harrisburg, they stopped to rest near a log lying against an outcropping of rock. When the fog lifted, the rock turned out to be gold.... Read More »

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