The Founding of Lucerne Valley

Looking southeast across Lucerne Valley

In the early days, natural springs in what is now Lucerne Valley provided good camping grounds for Indians on their way into the San Bernardino Mountains to gather piƱon nuts. The Indians resented white pioneers settling in the territory and committed some violent acts against them. Instead of discouraging the settlers, it caused them to marshall forces and attack the Indians. (Piute, Chemehuevi and Serrano) In Feb.1 1867, a decisive battle at Chimney Rock caused the Indians to retreat and leave the territory to the white pioneers.

Lucerne Valley

Rabbit Lake (dry) & Chimney Rock

In July, 1873, five men, L.D.Wilson, John E.McFee, W.S.Manning, W.P.Morrison and (?)Holmes located the springs known as Rabbit Springs. They laid claim to the springs and 100 surrounding acres (20 acres each) according to a recorded document.

Rabbit Spring – The original downtown Lucerne Valley

In 1884 Peter Davidson operated a Way Station at Rabbit Springs. Travelers could get fresh water, exchange news, rest and/or sleep over. “Uncle Pete” died in 1906. His grave is at Kendall Road and Rabbit Springs Road.

Pete Davidson's grave, Lucerne Valley

Uncle Pete Davidson’s grave (under the pavement beyond the marker)

In 1886, W.W.Brown brought his family to this valley, which was without a name at the time. Brown had the water rights at the Box S. (The Box S ranch is where the drainage ditch now crosses Highway 18) The family stayed at “Uncle Pete’s” until an old abandoned house could be moved onto the Box S property.

Box S Ranch, Lucerne Valley

Box S Ranch

In 1896 Al Swarthout acquired the Box S, intending to raise cattle. There was plenty of water but not much forage. Swarthout and a friend found a place about 15 miles to the east, which had even more water and lots of forage. After one year he gave up the Box S and moved to Old Woman Springs Ranch.

Old Woman Springs Ranch

Old Woman Springs Ranch

In 1897 James Goulding came to the Box S with his wife, Anna, and two small children, Mamie and George. Three more children, Minnie, Jim, and Nellie were born in Lucerne Valley. “Dad” Goulding proved the fertility of our soil with his apple orchard, vegetable garden and alfalfa fields. He also raised cows, horses and other animals. He dug a well which proved to be artesian.

In 1905 a friend suggested to Goulding that this valley should have a name. Because of his success in growing alfalfa (also known as lucerne) he christened this place Lucerne Valley.

Alfalfa field in Lucerne Valley

Alfalfa field in Lucerne Valley

Dad Goulding is generally acknowledged as the founder of Lucerne Valley.

 

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Adapted from; Mohahve V – A Quick History of Lucerne Valley by Ethel Owen
Mohahve Historical Society