May 3, 2016 Updates MojaveDesert.Net

Desert Fever
http://mojavedesert.net/desert-fever/

Desert Habitats

 

April 2016 Updates and New Pages: MojaveDesert.Net

New – Romantic Heritage of the Mojave River Valley
http://mojavedesert.net/books/mojave-river-valley/

New – Romantic Heritage of the Upper Mojave Desert
http://mojavedesert.net/books/upper-mojave/

Update – Ridgecrest, Ca.
http://digital-desert.com/ridgecrest-ca/

Update – Mormon Rocks (Cajon Pass)
http://digital-desert.com/mormon-rocks/

Update – Barstow, Ca.
http://digital-desert.com/barstow-ca/

July 2013, Updates

Indian Basketry:

“It has always amazed me…the first person that walked into the forest, and come out with a basket.”
~Vivien Hailstone (Yurok/Karuk/Hoopa Valley tribe)

Lost City:

Burrowing into the sandhills of Southern Nevada, archeologists have uncovered the homes and utensils of a thriving Indian civilization which existed 300 or 400 years before Columbus discovered America. Now the rising waters of Lake Mead are about to submerge the Lost City and remove it permanently from the field of research. But in the meantime the men of science have uncovered a wealth of interesting facts about these ancient tribesmen. The highlights of their discoveries are presented in this story by Johns Harrington, son of the archeologist in charge of the excavations. (reprint from Dec 1937, Desert Magazine)

The Captivity of the Oatman Girls:

This story has fascinated me since I first heard of it. The Mohave Indians impressed me as a people different from other desert Peoples in that I feel they were not only in control of the Mojave, but were a flawed people, wild in every way, and affected by the relatively sudden influx of pioneers and traders traveling through the area. The Mohave culture was brutal and raw, however, some of this story seems like it may have been enhanced for dramatic affect. For me it is interesting and historical in the way that there is no other like it.